Champ de Mars - Trocadéro: map of the Universal Exposition in Paris, 1900

Champ de Mars - Trocadéro: map of the Universal Exposition in Paris, 1900

Map from the Place de l’Etoile (or Place de l’Arc de Triomphe) in Paris, with imperial names and new names of the twelve avenues, from L’art des jardins, by Alfred-Auguste Ernouf, Paris, 1886

Map from the Place de l’Etoile (or Place de l’Arc de Triomphe) in Paris, with imperial names and new names of the twelve avenues, from L’art des jardins, by Alfred-Auguste Ernouf, Paris, 1886

Entrance of the Parc Monceau in Paris at the end of the XIXth century. (From L’art des jardins, by Alfred-Auguste Ernouf, Paris, 1886)

Entrance of the Parc Monceau in Paris at the end of the XIXth century. (From L’art des jardins, by Alfred-Auguste Ernouf, Paris, 1886)

Map of the Champ de Mars and the Invalides in Paris, 1850. The full map of Paris is on Gallica. It’s interesting to note that the towerless Champ de Mars was wider then. The rue de l’Eglise has now been renamed rue Cler. Many smaller streets are not depicted on this map.

Map of the Champ de Mars and the Invalides in Paris, 1850. The full map of Paris is on Gallica. It’s interesting to note that the towerless Champ de Mars was wider then. The rue de l’Eglise has now been renamed rue Cler. Many smaller streets are not depicted on this map.

On this LP cover, Donald Byrd reads (or pretends to read) the iconic French newspaper Le Figaro. The front page allows to date the photo quite precisely in 1958: it’s just after the coronation of pope John XXIII. At that time Byrd was living (and recording) in France.

On this LP cover, Donald Byrd reads (or pretends to read) the iconic French newspaper Le Figaro. The front page allows to date the photo quite precisely in 1958: it’s just after the coronation of pope John XXIII. At that time Byrd was living (and recording) in France.

The Pont-Neuf (the older bridge in Paris) used to have little shops on it; they have now disappeared.

L’Arc de Triomphe, Paris, circa 1852.

What is notable is the absence of buildings at that time; in the pure Roman tradition, the arch was set up to welcome the triumphant army, back from campaigns, before entering Paris. But Paris swallowed the arch.

L’Arc de Triomphe, Paris, circa 1852.

What is notable is the absence of buildings at that time; in the pure Roman tradition, the arch was set up to welcome the triumphant army, back from campaigns, before entering Paris. But Paris swallowed the arch.

Façade de l’Ecole Militaire, côté du Champ de Mars, Paris, 1840

Façade de l’Ecole Militaire, côté du Champ de Mars, Paris, 1840

A picture of the place currently known as Place de la Concorde (then Place de la Révolution) in Paris in January 1793, during the execution of Louis XVI for high treason. In the back we can see the Ministry of Navy, which still exists.

A picture of the place currently known as Place de la Concorde (then Place de la Révolution) in Paris in January 1793, during the execution of Louis XVI for high treason. In the back we can see the Ministry of Navy, which still exists.

The St-Jacques tower in Paris, 1912, being renovated, seen from the Nicolas Flamel street. The buildings are still there and have not changed, although many have been repurposed as offices for modern internet companies or other businesses.

The St-Jacques tower in Paris, 1912, being renovated, seen from the Nicolas Flamel street. The buildings are still there and have not changed, although many have been repurposed as offices for modern internet companies or other businesses.